Fred Connors for HRM

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It is interesting to see that your latest promotional materials have a picture of you with a bicycle. I am interested to know what your position is on the crosstown connector a project that was pushed forward by the Halifax Cycling Coalition who gathered 1400 signatures in support of the project? Also what is your vision for making Halifax a bicycle friendly city?

Asked by
Anonymous

The crosstown connector is by far the best and most efficient route to connect bike commuters on the peninsula. Existing challenges to parking for consumers attracted to the North End business district need to be addressed to get local business on board.

In the mean time, support for other potential initiatives such as shared streets in residential neighbourhoods and the University Ave Renewal Project need to also be championed so we can get more people on bikes and build the critical mass needed. Increased end-of-trip facilities like bike corrals on Agricola St would be a start. Removing some parking  for cars and dedicating it to bikes will increase the visibility of those on bikes and help build the bike culture in the district.

What is your viewpoint on the proposal to construct two 48-storey towers in downtown Halifax? How do you think this may or may not effect the development of the downtown core not only directly related to the towers construction but the longer term residual effects?

Asked by
Anonymous

I support and respect HRM by Design and the expertise that developed it. There is a tremendous need for great design and iconic architecture to define our downtown but not in the form of 2 48 story glass towers in the midst of traditionally lower buildings. This opens the way for more development that is not aligned with what is a solid vision for the development of downtown. There are many opportunities for height to be developed on the peninsula and those should be looked at. 

When I view the rendering of Skye towers, I am instantly reminded of a smaller imitation of the former WTC in NY and we need more than imitations of older architecture to define us as a city in the future. 

Fred

Do you have a plan to intice skilled young people who have left Halifax for other areas of Canada to come back?

Asked by
Anonymous

The success of our city hinges on creating opportunity for skilled, talented and innovative young people to feel they have a future here. Ensuring HRM is open for business so young people can contribute to our economic and cultural future is very important for the growth of Halifax. This involves shaping our city into a place innovators want to be, not just get a job. If we can’t bring our talent back and keep the ones we have, Halifax will be filled with boring people and that is not the city I want to live in. This is very much part of my plan and why I decided to run in the first place.

Fred

"Spent the day in HRM’s eastern shore, eating, beach walking, garage sale shopping, eating, site seeing, touring, talking, eating, meeting great people and more eating. It is well worth the trip." - Fred ConnorsSee more photos of our trip - http://on.fb.me/HCaUo5

"Spent the day in HRM’s eastern shore, eating, beach walking, garage sale shopping, eating, site seeing, touring, talking, eating, meeting great people and more eating. It is well worth the trip." - Fred Connors

See more photos of our trip - 
http://on.fb.me/HCaUo5

MSVU students on a North End Food Tour as part of their course “Ecological Perspectives of Food”, challenging students to think critically about our food system. The tour began this morning at Fred’s Bloomfield urban garden to learn more about raising chickens, urban agriculture and sustainable living.

MSVU students on a North End Food Tour as part of their course “Ecological Perspectives of Food”, challenging students to think critically about our food system. The tour began this morning at Fred’s Bloomfield urban garden to learn more about raising chickens, urban agriculture and sustainable living.

From what I know, many current city councillors are closed-minded and opposed to progress that extends beyond 5 years, and I am tired of them stalling our city’s growth because of their personal lack of vision. What is your strategy on winning over those city councillors and getting them to come to your side with their votes on issues that would help shape this city into something that can and deserves to be?

Asked by
Anonymous

Aligning a divided group to a common goal or vision is one of the biggest challenges in leadership and great leaders eventually succeed. Proving ones ability outside of the existing system (council), and demonstrating effective leadership often results in willing participation. It will not happen over night.

Whether I like it or not, I'm pretty sure you're not going to be Mayor. But we need you. Why don't you withdraw and run for Council instead? You'd have a really good shot at that and have an opportunity to make a really big difference in the next 4 years. And if you have any influence over Lil, make sure she runs for council as well. We really need change here - you are two bright sparks that might ignite that.

Asked by
Anonymous

With the boundary changes in HRM, Jennifer Watts will be running and she is doing a great job and has the support she needs to be reelected. Fundamental change does not happen with a new mayor, it exists in new ideas and I am looking forward to sharing mine i the upcoming campaign.

What do YOU think this city is ready for? One of several questions and ideas shared at the Fred Connors for HRM event held last night. Thank you those able to attend and for everyone for the great show of support to transition HRM into the city it deserves to be!

What do YOU think this city is ready for?
One of several questions and ideas shared at the Fred Connors for HRM event held last night. Thank you those able to attend and for everyone for the great show of support to transition HRM into the city it deserves to be!